Medley: Inspiration

From time to time I may just ruminate random thoughts, readings and things that don’t blog long. We’ll call this – medley.

This made me laugh out loud at work! ‘Numpty’ voted nation’s best word

This “Frozen” month two colleagues left our workplace. These were people that were always a positive part of any day I was lucky enough to interact with them. I miss them already, but wish them well in their transitions – their “fertile chaos of the neutral zone” from Making Sense of Those Pesky Life Transitions

I’m preparing a lecture on Big Data and looking at it from a Digital Humanities perspective. New (to me) is this nonfiction read Raw Data is an Oxymoron, edited by Lisa Getilman

Book Cover
http://www.npr.org/2014/01/30/264525472/historical-trauma-makes-for-thrilling-fiction-in-officer-and-a-spy

 

My latest – couldn’t put it down – historical fiction read recommendation:
An Officer and the Spy by Robert Harris

I know way too little about this period in history.

 

 

 

While thinking more about the e-reading experience; I am sad not to get an author’s signature on Bruce Rosenstein‘s new book Create Your Future the Peter Drucker Way, and very sad not to be able to pass along my now read e-copy of An Officer and the Spy.

E.L. Doctorow says “reading is the most interactive experience imaginable” from E.L.Doctorow: The American author on his novel Andrew’s Brain, mysteries of the mind and why ebooks are no match for the real deal from an Interview by David Wolf  in The Observer, Saturday 18 January 2014

As we “lurch into digital reading” do your brain a favor:
The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens. E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages
Apr 11, 2013 |By Ferris Jabr

Always, always poetry inspires and saves as “poems find us.”
Thoughts on Poetry in Winter by Carolyn Foster Segal

That is the secret of poetry’s fresh (psychic) news: quite simply and quite complexly, poems find us, and then they encourage us, as Jorie Graham says in “Afterwards,” to “begin with the world.”

 

 
















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2 thoughts on “Medley: Inspiration”

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  2. Aw, this was an extremely nice post. Spending some time and actual effort to produce a great article… but what can I say… I hesitate a whole lot and never manage to get nearly anything done.

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